FUCHSIA JUDGING SCHOOL MANUAL

and

AFS JUDGING RULES

4th Edition

 

 

Published by

American Fuchsia Society

Editor

Elsie A. Sydnor

Originally compiled and edited by

Doris Kelly, Judging Chairperson

Cover by

Robert Bradley

 

 

©1985, 1986, 1993 by the American Fuchsia Society

all rights reserved

 

ISBN-0-963167-2-1

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

 

 

The American Fuchsia Society greatly appreciates the efforts of all the people who, over the years, have contributed their thoughtful efforts to the evolution of the current AFS Judging Rules and Standards.

During the presidency of Harry Brumeister, a committee was appointed to establish and publish the rules and standards of judging fuchsias. With the help of John Rolih, Bob Castro and Ted Paskesen, this was accomplished and printed in the May, 1976 AFS Bulletin.

Past AFS President Jean Natter allowed the AFS to use much of her material for the first Fuchsia Judges School Manual.

For all new judges who have successfully completed the requirements for certification, we wish many years of pleasure and accomplishment as American Fuchsia Society accredited Judges.

This manual was revised July 10, 1993, by the following committee, chaired by Phillip Scherer: Ronnie Duffield, Director of Judging, Lorine Gandolfi, John Rolih and Elsie Wolfers.

The 4th edition was publshed by AFS Judging Coordinator Madalyn Drago with the contributions of Chuck Hassett and Kent Walker.

JUDGES COUNCIL

The Judges Council was formed in San Mateo, California on October 26, 1991. The primary reason for this meeting was to organize and establish a set of by-laws. In accordance with the by-laws, an election of officers for 1992-1993 was held. The following Judges were nominated and received a unanimous vote of the members present:

Chairperson Ronnie Duffield

Vice-Chairperson Irene Bergum

Secretary Chuck Hassett

Treasurer Leon Hubbard

Charter Members of the Judges Council:

Ronnie and Lee Duffield, Charles and Carole Rapp, Gordon and Irene Bergum, Frank and Lorine Gandolfi, Alice Kennedy, Elsie Wolfers, Charles Loveland, John Rolih, Paul Riviere, Leon Hubbard, Christine Kemp, Chuck and Mary Hassett, Will Gibbs, Joan Hampton and Phillip Scherer.

FORWARD

 

 

In this fourth edition of the Fuchsia Judging School Manual and AFS Judging Rules, an effort has been made to provide a more condensed teaching and reference tool by eliminating unnecessary repetition and reorganizing the text in a more orderly sequence.

The contents are designed to present the ethics, procedures, methods, and standards whereby fuchsias can be judged in a professional manner, fairly, objectively, without prejudice, and in a uniform manner throughout the Society.

All the material is based on current and widely accepted practice.

It should be understood that this material is not "cast in concrete." Where there may be room for improvement, thoughtful and valid suggestions, together with constructive comments will be welcomed for consideration.

CONTENTS

Fuchsia Judging School Manual

Requirements for Certification 4

The Purpose and Value of a Show 6

Show Schedule 7

Ethics in Judging 10

Characteristics of a Competent Judge 11

Payment for Judging 11

The Judge and the Show Manager 12

What a Show Manager Expects from a Judge 12

What a Judge Can Expect from a Show Manager 14

The Judging Process 15

The Judges' Responsibility to the Exhibitor 16

The Methods of Judging 17

Judging the Plant Forms 18

Instructions to the Clerks 21

AFS Standards and Judging Rules

General Rules 24

Individual Point Scale 28

Definition and Rules for Judging Fuchsia Forms 31

Full Basket or Hanging Fuchsia 31

Half Basket Fuchsia 31

Bush Fuchsia 32

Shrub Fuchsia 33

Standard (Tree) Fuchsia 34

Decorative Forms 36

Trellis, Fan 36

Espalier 37

Pillar 37

Cordon 37

Pyramid 38

Conical 38

Decorative Forms not Otherwise Listed 39

Miniature Fuchsia 39

Bonsai Fuchsia 40

Variegated Leaf Fuchsia 42

Fuchsia Species 43

Cut Fuchsia Classes 44

Point Scale for Fuchsia Blooms 45

Corsages, Nosegays, Leis 47

Construction Point Scale for Corsages and Nosegays 47

Construction Point Scale for Leis 49

Point Scale for Cut Branches 51

Point Scale for Education Exhibit 53

Additional Reading 54

FUCHSIA JUDGING SCHOOL

MANUAL

 

 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION

AS AN AFS JUDGE

 

 

At this time the requirements to attain certification as an American Fuchsia Society Judge are as follows:

APPRENTICE

  1. Be a member of good standing in the AFS.
  2. Be an active fuchsia grower.
  3. Attend an AFS Judging School and complete a written examination with a minimum grade of 75%.
  4. Participate in two judged shows as any of the following :

  1. Clerk (must be Head Clerk one time)
  2. Show Chairman

  1. Obtain and submit all applications from the AFS Judges Director.
  2. Maintain a record of all show clerking, chairing and judging experience.

CERTIFIED JUDGE

  1. Complete two years as an Apprentice Judge.
  2. Attend one symposium within two years of certification.
  3. Participate as an Apprentice Judge in at least two Judged Fuchsia Shows.
  4. Obtain and complete an Application for Certified Judge from the AFS Judges Director. Include a report of any show you may have judged or clerked, giving time, date and place.

MASTER JUDGE

  1. Complete requirements for Certified Judge.
  2. Complete five years experience as a certified judge.
  3. Judge a minimum of five shows and attend two symposiums within the past five years.
  4. Only Master Judges are eligible to conduct a Judging School.

TO MAINTAIN STATUS AS AN ACTIVE JUDGE

During the past two years:

  1. Attend at least one symposium (advanced judging class) or have given a program on growing a show plant and how to judge it at a Branch meeting.
  2. Judge a minimum of one show, reporting to the AFS Judging Chairperson.

If an active judge wishes to become inactive, the AFS Judging Coordinator needs to be notified.

THE PURPOSE AND VALUE OF A SHOW

 

To educate the grower/exhibitor by providing an opportunity to:

To educate the general public to:

SSHOW SCHEDULE

PLANNING THE SHOW SCHEDULE

The first step in planning a Show is to establish a date and location. The final decision should be made by the Show Committee and club officers. It is advisable to allow one year for the planning of a show.

The next step is to appoint a chairperson, who then appoints the various committees.

The Show Chairperson should possess knowledge, experience, enthusiasm, imagination, time, ambition and the ability to delegate responsibility. The Show Chairperson has the following responsibilities:

  1. Appoint all committee chairpersons and define their duties.
  2. Finalize the arrangements for the location of the show.
  3. Call meetings to coordinate plans.
  4. Attend all committee meetings.
  5. Obtain all required forms.
  6. Be readily available.
  7. Maintain records for future chairpersons.

THE SCHEDULE

The schedule becomes the LAW OF THE SHOW. It must be clear, specific, accurate and comprehensive. A good schedule includes:

  1. General information
  1. Appropriate theme
  2. Plant material
  3. Available properties (such as tables, frames, pedestals, etc.)
  4. Space available
  5. Information required by the exhibitors and judges
  6. Judging time
  7. Times when the show is open to the public
  8. Times when entries are to be received and removed.
  1. Rules and regulations for all divisions, sections and classes
  2. Awards offered using a point scale as defined in the AFS Judging Manual must be included.
  3. Competitive classes for all divisions
  4. Name /s of sponsoring club /s
  5. Date: month, day, year
  6. Location: building, address, city, state
  7. Show hours
  8. Admission, if any.
  9. Exhibitor requirements

RULES FOR ALL DIVISIONS

  1. All the specimens must have been grown by the exhibitor.
  2. Container-grown plants must have been in the possession of the exhibitor for no less than three months.
  3. All specimens must be labeled.
  4. All horticultural classes are open to any amateur grower.
  5. More than one entry per class may be entered by an exhibitor, provided each is a different cultivar.
  6. All entries must be tagged by the Classification Committee or Show Clerk, including the name of the plant and exhibitor's name.

AWARDS

Awards are given according to the Point Scale. First, second, third, honorable mention, sweepstakes, (if so desired), and Best of Show (if so desired).

 

 

 

 

ETHICS IN JUDGING

 

ethics: the rules of human conduct recognized in respect to a particular class of human actions or a particular group.

 

Ethics: Wisdom in Conduct

In every instance, an American Fuchsia Society Judge should perform in the most professional manner possible when participating in a show. As a representative of the society the judge should perform in a courteous and helpful manner, discuss the judging decisions calmly, and display a professional attitude. This cooperative attitude will result in a friendly feeling and encourage show and fair managers to call on AFS judges in the future.

The position of accredited judge is both an honor and a challenge. You have the responsibility to be a worthy representative of your society.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A COMPETENT

JUDGE

KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE:

How it is acquired:

Why it is necessary:

OBJECTIVITY:

TACT:

An Exercise in the "Power of Positive Thinking: "

PAYMENT FOR JUDGING

THE JUDGE AND THE SHOW MANAGER

WHAT A SHOW MANAGER EXPECTS

FROM A JUDGE

A prompt answer to the judging invitation:

If you cannot come, contact the manager as soon as possible so that he may make suitable arrangements. Do not, however, arrange your own substitute.

Prompt arrival at the correct place on the day of judging.

Prompt and efficient attention to judging duties.

Undivided attention to:

While Judging:

Assistance to the Manager:

WWHAT A JUDGE CAN EXPECT

FROM A SHOW MANAGER

The necessary information:

Rights of a Judge:

Knowledgeable clerk(s) to assist during the judging process:

Enough judges to complete the task easily within reasonable time limits.

THE JUDGING PROCESS

 

THE SCHEDULE:

IS THE LAW OF THE SHOW.

STATES THE RULES OF THE GAME.

Who conforms to the schedule:

The judge must be familiar with the schedule prior to arriving at the show.

THE OVERVIEW

THE JUDGES' RESPONSIBILITY TO THE EXHIBITOR

Know the schedule and what is required of the exhibitor:

Judge the exhibit using the same set of guidelines that was provided to the grower. These standards are usually printed in the schedule, and should be sent to the judge prior to show time. If you do not receive them, ask.

Constructive Comments to the Exhibitor

After careful objective evaluation is complete, the judging panel must then make an objective and beneficial comment to the exhibitor. Writing the constructive comment may well be the most difficult part of your judging assignment. Both time and space are very limited.

The written comment is a joint opinion of the judges on the panel. Be clear, concise, instructive and logical.

THE METHODS OF JUDGING

A Panel of Judges

JUDGING THE PLANT FORMS

A competent fuchsia judge will judge from an objective viewpoint.

Judging is a mental operation involving comparison with an ideal.

 

The basic rules of judging plant material are as follows:

  1. Judge "as is."
  2. Judge according to form.
  3. Judge according to variety.
  4. Judge according to an appropriate point scale.

"As Is"

Judge the exhibit as it is now.

A judge has the responsibility to award that which is the closest to perfection at the time he is seeing it.

According to Form

"Form" refers to the particular form that is stated in the schedule.

According to Variety

The judge must develop a mental picture of the best possible specimen for the variety. As your experiences accumulate, you may well find it necessary to revise this picture to fit different standards.

Factors under consideration include the following:

The problem-child: difficulty of growth:

A mature fuchsia in active characteristic growth presents general good health, good cultural practice and thorough pre-show grooming. It is in full fresh bloom, having the bloom well-distributed over the plant. It is well-trained, according to the form stated. Supports, if used, should be inconspicuous.

A good judge acquaints himself with the normal range of color, size, form and growth that is consistent with that particular variety in that particular locale.

No individual can know all "normal" variations, but each person can make an effort to constantly update and increase current knowledge and experience.

Appropriate Point Scale

Point scale is a device to:

The appropriate point scale, when correctly used, enables the judge to compare bush fuchsias, basket fuchsias, tree fuchsias, and all other forms of fuchsias. Then, the judge is able to make a knowledgeable and wise decision as to which is best.

This requires that the judge constantly realign his thinking to make sure he is judging by the standards set forth for each type, form, and variety.

A major key to successful use of a scale is consistency of deductions for faults.

Point scoring may be done mentally or on paper, as the situation requires.

Awarding/Withholding Awards

Competitive Judging:

Only one first-, one second-, and one third-place ribbon may be awarded in each class, providing a plant deserves it. If no plant is worthy of an award, none should be given.

Merit Judging:

In the Merit Judging system, more than one First-, Second-, or Third-Place award may be given in each class based on the point score* assigned by the judges.

 

All Clerks

  1. Although this may be a learning experience, maintain adequate space between yourselves and the judges.
  2. Help to maintain space around the judges.
  1. Do not interpose yourself between the judges and the plants.
  2. Tactfully request the public to do the same.
  1. Do not offer opinions to nor ask questions of the judges during the judging process. Tactful questions may be directed to them after the judging is completed.
  2. If it's your plant, keep a straight face!
  3. Help to open entry tags after all judging is complete.
  4. The role of a clerk is one of privilege and esteem. The clerk is regarded as a confidant of the judges, who, in turn, would expect their trust to be honored. Therefore, do not repeat to others remarks made by judges during judging.
  5. Refer questions from exhibitors to the judges.
  6. Familiarize yourself with the locations of entries ahead of time so you won't delay the judging process looking for individual entries or entire classes.

First Clerk

  1. Before beginning, request of your judges who is to record the awards (1, 2, 3, or NA) and constructive comments. Judge or clerk? (NA = no award, and indicates that the plant was judged and not just overlooked.)
  2. Remain with judges at all times and be the one point of contact between judges and clerks.
  3. Have charge of the entry sheets. Judges are not to see the exhibitors' names.
  4. As each class is approached

  1. Announce the Division and Class
  2. Read a brief description of the class (e.g. "cascading baskets, single blossoms").
  3. State the number of plants to be considered in this class.
  4. Have the second clerk point out the location of these plants.

  1. While a class is being judged, have the second clerk locate the plants for the next class.
  2. Record accurately on entry sheets (1, 2, 3, HM, or NA). HM= Honorable Mention; NA = No Award
  3. Inform judges of any Special Awards to be determined, and record accurately on entry sheets.
  4. When all your classes are judged, have your judges sign the last page of your entry sheets.
  5. Keep all clerks and judges together until all judging has been completed and the group is dismissed by the Judges Chairman.
  6. Questions of classification, judging, placement, etc. may be directed to the Judges Chairman for clarification during judging.

Second Clerk

  1. Locate plants, as directed by the first clerk.
  2. Make sure all entry tags are closed prior to judging.
  3. Turn plants, if requested to do so by the judges.

Third Clerk

  1. Carry and attach the ribbons and "award cards" as directed.
  2. Mark entry tag with award given and/or constructive comments, if requested to do so by judges.
  3. As requested, locate plants and/or turn them.

 

AFS STANDARDS

and

JUDGING RULES

Preface

In the following material every effort has been made to adhere as closely as possible to the intent of American Fuchsia Society Standards & Judging Rules as presented when first published in May, 1976. They have stood the "test of time" and served us well, so little has been changed beyond amplifying and clarifying them.

General Rules

  1. Any plant, stem or cut bloom exhibited for an award shall have been owned by the exhibitor for 90 days.
  2. The same rule applies to any fuchsia plant in any group exhibited by a Branch.
  3. The rule does not apply to arrangements of any kind where cut blossoms are used and construction is the primary object of judging.
  1. Size of containers shall conform to the show schedule and measurements shall apply to inside dimensions.
  1. Stakes, trellises, frames and ties where required should be neat and inconspicuous in size and color.
  2. Stakes or frames should not extend above the highest point of the plants.
  1. Unless otherwise specified, there should be only one plant in a container (see local show schedule for exceptions).
  2. Multiple plants in one container must be the same variety.
  3. Sport blossoms and leaves should be removed as the plant is not performing according to variety.

  1. Plants must be free of insects, parasites, and disease.
  2. Plants should be well-groomed.
  1. All wilted, spent, or damaged blooms, off-color or damaged foliage, dead leaves, dead or bare laterals or branches must be removed.
  2. Seed pods and their pedicils must be removed except on fuchsia species when exhibited in the species division.
  3. Soil surface must be clean and neat, with all debris and litter removed.
  4. There must be no evidence of chemical sprays or water residue stains.
  5. All training devices such as weights, pins, and hooks must be removed.
  6. Containers must be clean, neat, undamaged, and inconspicuous.
  1. All plants, stems, and cut blooms should be legibly and correctly named for identification of cultivar or species.
  2. Errors in naming shall not disqualify an entry, but, when all judges are positive an entry is wrongly identified, points shall be deducted in accordance with the point scale.
  3. Identification of blooms is not mandatory for arrangements, leis, corsages and nosegays except where required by show schedule, but it is a courtesy to the public to identify them.
  1. Where the year of introduction is specified in the show schedule, plants must have been registered with the American Fuchsia Society, and dates shall be shown in the registration record of the Society.
  2. Unless otherwise stated in these rules, plants must be viewed from all around to assess uniformity of growth and condition of foliage and bloom.
  3. Judges are not permitted to touch or move a plant but may request a clerk to do so.

  1. Plants shall be judged using a point score scale appropriate to the class being judged.
  2. Plants shall be judged for:

  1. Cultural Proficiency
  2. Quantity and quality of bloom
  3. General presentation
  4. Correct labeling

  1. Point scales are always used in reference to the four basic judging rules:

  1. "As is" at time of judging.
  2. According to variety.
  3. According to form.
  4. Use of appropriate point scale.
  1. Individual Point Scale
  1. To be used when judging baskets, half baskets, bushes, shrubs, standards, all decorative forms, miniatures, bonsai and species.
  2. Shall also be used when judging variegated leaf forms where the points for blooms shall be awarded for foliage.
  3. Cut blossom classes have their own point scale. (See rules for cut blossom classes.)
  1. Only whole points will be awarded. The entry receiving the highest number of points shall be first, next highest second, and third highest third.
  2. Where groups of plants are judged together each plant will be awarded its earned points and the points for all plants in the group shall be added for a grand total to determine the winning group.
  3. At their discretion, judges may award an Honorable Mention where competition is close.
  4. Nothing in these rules will preclude a judge from scoring entries mentally without a score pad.

  1. If, in the opinion of a majority of the judges, the entry of the winner of the highest number of points is not of sufficient quality consistent with the division in which it is entered, then any award may be based on a relatively lower standing.

  1. Normally three judges shall be required to judge a plant, an exhibit, or a section of an exhibit.
  2. Failure of a judge to appear shall not suspend or delay judging at the appointed time.

  1. Decisions of the judges will be final.

INDIVIDUAL POINT SCALE

 

Individual Point Scale:

  1. CULTURAL PROFICIENCY (40)

  1. Growth
  1. Uniformity 10
  2. Fullness 10

  1. Freshness of Foliage 10
  2. Culture and Training 10

  1. QUALITY and QUANTITY of BLOOM (40)

  1. Flowering

  1. Amount 10
  2. Evenness of distribution 15
  3. Condition of flowers 15

  1. GENERAL PRESENTATION (15)

  1. Grooming 5
  2. Freedom from insects and disease 3
  3. Size of container 3
  4. Condition of container 2
  5. Supports 2

  1. LABELlNG for DENTlFICATION
    of CULTIVAR (5)

  1. Accuracy 2
  2. Legibility and neatness 2
  3. Visibility 1

  1. TOTALS 100

In order to properly utilize a point scale, a judge must develop a mental picture of perfection according to variety and form. A major key to the successful use of a point scale is consistency of deduction for faults.

Cultural Proficiency:

Quantity and Quality of Bloom

Evenness of Distribution

Blooms should be evenly distributed all around the plant, along the laterals according to the normal habit of the variety.

Condition of Flowers, Quality

General Presentation

Labeling for Identification

DEFINITION AND RULES

FOR JUDGING

FUCHSIA FORMS

FULL BASKET OR HANGING FUCHSIA

Shall present a balanced effect of evenly-distributed, gracefully-hanging streamers of foliage and flowers.

Judged by Individual Point Scale

Schedule Placement may be by :

General Requirements:

HALF BASKET FUCHSIAS

A half basket is grown similarly to a full basket fuchsia, except that it is in a container suitable for attachment to a wall or similar structure and is to be viewed from three sides.

Judging shall be the same as for hanging fuchsias except containers are "half rounds" or "half squares."

BUSH FUCHSIA

A fuchsia bush is an upright fuchsia plant with a single, straight stem or trunk clear of branches for no more than one-fifth of the total height of the plant. One plant to a container presenting a balanced effect of flowers and foliage when viewed from any side.

 

Judged by individual Point Scale

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

BUSH

SHRUB FUCHSIA

One plant with a number of stems originating from the soil surface, none of which dominates. Should be two to three times the height of the container with a profusion of flowers and evenly-distributed foliage to present a balanced effect when viewed from any side.

Judged by Individual Point Scale

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

SHRUB

 

STANDARD (TREE) FUCHSIA

Shall have one straight trunk, free from leaves and deformity. The crown (head) shall be a profusion of branches, flowers, and foliage, and shall present a balanced effect from all sides.

Judged by Individual Point Scale

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

stem.

 

 

 

Fig. 1 Fig. 2

 

DECORATIVE FORMS

 

TRELLIS, FAN

Trellises and fans are single plants grown and trained on a rigid lattice frame and should present a symmetrically-balanced plant on both sides of the center, well-covered with foliage and a profusion of blossoms when viewed from the front.

Judged by Individual Point Scale.

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

ESPALIER

Shall have one vertical stem with a series of branches opposite each other. More formal in appearance than trellis or fan. The framework of the plant should be clearly seen. Lengths of branches need not be equal, but the plant should present a balanced effect of flowers and foliage.

Judging and Schedule Placement are as for trellis or fan.

PILLAR

An upright plant grown on a single stem, trained to a central stake with all laterals of about equal length, to produce, when viewed from all sides, a graceful column of abundant flowers and foliage.

Judged by Individual Point Scale.

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements

 

CORDON

Two or three upright plants of the same variety. Single stems closely adjacent and tied to a central stake. It is to be expected that with the use of multiple plants, the height and diameter will be greater than the single pillar.

Judging, Schedule Placement, and General Requirements are as for a pillar.

 

PYRAMID

An upright plant grown on a single stem to produce a uniformly-tapering triangular shape. The pyramid shape must be maintained when viewed from all sides and should be fully covered with foliage and abundant flowers.

Judged by Individual Point Scale.

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

 

CONICAL

Is grown similarly to a pyramid except that its shape is more cone-like, being taller and slimmer.

DECORATIVE FORMS NOT OTHERWISE LISTED

Other decorative forms may be grown with individual imagination , such as Rings, Double Rings, Bells, Spirals, Dollar Signs, etc. They may be trained to any decorative frame. Each form must present a well-balanced effect with a profusion of flowers.

Judged by Individual Point Scale

 

MINIATURE FUCHSIA

A single plant growing in a four-inch or smaller container. The small growing-pot may be set inside a slightly larger container to provide stability to the specimen.

Judged by Individual Point Scale

Schedule Placement by:

General Requirements:

A size limitation stated for this form of growing a fuchsia, including underliner and container, is not to be more than 15" in any dimension.

A miniature may be grown to any of the forms other than bonsai.

BONSAI FUCHSIA (pronounced "bone-sigh")

A bonsai consists basically of a dwarfed plant or plants, with or without rocks or moss, all in a tray or other type of bonsai container. When a fuchsia is grown in this manner, it must be full of blooms unless it is grown principally for its colored leaves, in which case it may be exhibited without bloom. In either case, its total size must be in proportion to the container.

Abridged definition: a plant, grown in a dish or tray, giving the appearance of age and an artful creation of nature in miniature.

Judged by Individual Point Scale.

Schedule Placement may be by:

General Requirements:

UPRIGHT-

FORMAL

 

UPRIGHT-

FORMAL

 

SLANTING

 

 

 

 

 

SEMI-CASCADE

CASCADE

RULE OF

THREE POINTS

TOP VIEW

VARIEGATED LEAF FUCHSIA

A fuchsia which is grown and judged primarily on the basis of its leaf color and quality. Leaves must have a combination of two or more colors. Flowers are not required.

Judged by Individual Point Scale except that color and quality of foliage are scored in place of blooms.

Schedule Placement may be by:

It may be exhibited in either:

Other than leaf characteristics, the fuchsia is judged according to the form to which it is grown (i.e. basket, bush, etc.)

Variegated fuchsias must conform to the definition of "two or more leaf colors." The colors include: white, light green, red or pink, cream or gold.

Green or gold leaves with red veins do not fit this definition.

Variegation has the different colors in definite patches, blotches, streaks, or mottling. There is frequently a sharp demarcation between the colors.

No solid green leaves are to be present.

Flowers are not required, but may be present. No credit will be given for bloom present. Point scale reflects the quality of the plant and its leaf color.

Leaf color should be judged according to variety. A good judge must develop an awareness of the color range development consistent with good horticultural practices. Be knowledgeable of the "full color development for the variety," and the effects of excess light and too little light.

FUCHSIA SPECIES

Fuchsia species are plants of original parentage or beginning ancestry as recognized by the American Fuchsia Society.

Judged by Individual Point Scale according to form as defined by Judging Rules.

Schedule Placement may be by:

All General Requirements apply.

 

CUT FUCHSIA CLASSES

 

It is recommended that all cut flower classes be the first order of judging while entries are fresh. In their cut condition they deteriorate very rapidly in any adverse condition such as temperature or humidity. Any deterioration makes judging exceedingly difficult and is unfair to the exhibitor.

 

CUT FUCHSIA BLOSSOMS

Fresh fuchsia blooms are displayed floating in a dish unless show schedule designates some other form of presentation.

A fuchsia bloom is complete only when it has a pedicil, seed pod, tube, four sepals, corolla, eight stamens, and a pistil. All normal blossoms have only four sepals.

Judged by Fuchsia Bloom Scale

Schedule Placement may be by:

 

Fuchsia Bloom Point Scale

  1. PERFECTION OF BLOOM (50)

  1. Maturity 10
  2. Form 10
  3. Sepals 10
  4. Color 5
  5. Condition 10
  6. Freedom from Insects and Disease 5
  1. FRESHNESS of BLOOM (30)
  1. Bloom 10
  2. Stamen 10
  3. Pistils 10
  1. GENERAL PRESENTATION (10)
  1. Adherence to Show Schedule 5
  2. Uniformity of Development 5
  1. LABELING for IDENTIFICATION (10)
  1. Accuracy 5
  2. Legibility and Neatness 5
  1. TOTALS 100

Perfection of Bloom

Freshness of Blooms

Presentation:

Correct labeling:

CORSAGES, NOSEGAYS, LEIS

Corsages, nosegays, and leis all emphasize the use of cut fuchsia blossoms in arrangements designed and constructed to be worn or carried as personal adornment.

To be judged by Construction Point Scale

Check show schedule for restrictions on use of material such as buds, ferns, and other plant material.

Check for use of accessories and method of presentation.

Construction Point Scale for Corsages and Nosegays

  1. SKILL of CONSTRUCTION (40)

  1. Wiring and Taping 10
  2. Blooms 10
  3. Bows 10
  4. Ribbon 5
  5. Pin / Doilies or Framework 5

  1. COLOR HARMONY (25)

  1. Taping 10
  2. Ribbon 10
  3. Pin / Doilies or Framework 5

  1. FLOWER QUALlTY and CONDITION (25)

  1. Freshness 10
  2. Free from Insects and Disease 5
  3. Condition of Stamens and Pistils 5
  4. Condition of Sepals and Corolla 5

  1. PRESENTATION (10)

  1. Adherence to Show Schedule 5
  2. Appearance of Boxes, Mats, etc. 5

  1. TOTALS 100

 

CORSAGES AND NOSEGAYS

Skill of Construction

Color Harmony

Quality and Condition of Flowers

Presentation:

LEIS

Construction Point Scale for Leis

  1. SKILL of CONSTRUCTION (60)
  1. Stringing (Length and Direction) 20
  2. Uniformity of Cultivar 10
  3. Pistils and Stamens 10
  4. No Tubes or Seed Pods 10
  5. Fullness 10
  1. COLOR HARMONY (5)
  1. 1. Ribbon-closing 5
  1. FLOWER QUALITY and CONDITION (25)
  1. Freshness 10
  2. Free from Insects and Disease 5
  3. Condition of Stamens and Pistils 5
  4. Condition of Sepals and Corolla 5

  1. PRESENTATION (10)

  1. Adherence to Show Schedule 5
  2. Appearance of Boxes, Mats, etc. 5

  1. TOTALS 100

Skill of Construction

Harmony

If schedule permits, a ribbon-closing should be inconspicuous and of harmonizing color.

Quality and Condition of Flower

Presentation

CUT BRANCHES

 

Branches of fuchsias may be one or more stems of the same cultivar displayed in a container.

Point Scale for Cut Branches:

  1. PERFECTION of BLOOM and FOLIAGE (70)
  1. Freshness of Bloom 25
  2. Form and Color of Bloom 15
  3. Freshness of Foliage 10
  4. Stems 10
  5. Free of Insects and Disease 10
  1. BRANCHES (10)
  1. Arrangement of Branches 10
  1. PRESENTATION (10)
  1. 1. Adherence to Schedule 5
  2. 2. Container 5
  1. CORRECT LABELING (10)
  1. Neatness and Legibility 5
  2. Accuracy 5
  1. TOTALS 100

Schedule Placement may be by:

Perfection of Bloom and Foliage:

 

Arrangement of Branches

Presentation

Correct labeling:

EDUCATION EXHIBIT

Point Scale for Education Exhibit

  1. EDUCATIONAL VALUE (35)
  1. To inform public 20
  1. Life cycle of a fuchsia
  2. Hand-outs of fuchsia culture
  3. Create interest in AFS
  1. Clear and quality presentation 15
  1. VARIETIES (25)
  1. Uprights and trailers 5
  2. Singles, doubles, semi-doubles 5
  3. Species 5
  4. Plant habit and general growth
    characteristics 10
  1. DESIGN (20)
  1. Eye-catching 10
  2. Continuity of layout 10
  1. CONDITION (10)
  1. Freshness of material 5
  2. Neatness and simplicity 5
  1. LABELING (10)
  1. Clear, easy to read 5
  2. Accuracy 5
  1. TOTALS (100)

SUGGESTED READING

NWFS Judges Manual

Northwest Fuchsia Society

P.O. Box 33071

Seattle, WA 98133-0071

 

Growing and Showing Fuchsias

by Leo Boullemier

1985

 

Fuchsias

by George Bartlett

1988

 

Practical Fuchsia Growing

by Alan Toogood

1992